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Posts tagged “Sunset

Otter Cliffs

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I’ve been revisiting some old images, and found this one from a 2008 visit to Acadia National Park in Maine.  This one was overexposed but I was able to extract some lost detail and color in the sky, much to my surprise.  Shooting RAW is the only way to fly!   I believe that’s Otter Cliffs in the distance.  I love Acadia – it’s a do-not-miss destination especially if you time it right, and visit in the correct one to two week period for fall colors.   (Which varies year to year of course-usually sometime in October.)


The Fires Of Sunset

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Sunset storm in Wichita, Kansas  about an hour ago.  My next few posts were supposed to be airshow photos, but this sky thing happened tonight so I ran out for a quick snap.


Supernatural Fog #3 & #4

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Hawk Road

 

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Prior to stopping at Sunset Road, described in my last two posts, on Sunday we first stopped at Hawk Road.   There was a wind farm in the distance, and  this is the one image from that stop that I kind of liked.  This is somewhat strange, because I generally despise power lines.   Sometimes though, if they are out in the country, receding into the distance, on old school T shaped poles ….they kind of work.   I may never admit to that again!


Sunset Road No. 2

 

 

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Yesterday I posted about the uncanny appearance of the aptly named “Sunset Road” on a trip home last Sunday.   This is the last image from that stop.   Usually I try and avoid man-made objects in a landscape, other than something  like a windmill or barn, but for some reason I included our car in this one.   I had been in front of the car a couple minutes earlier, shooting towards the sunset.   Once I got these up on the computer,  I liked the sky in this one better.  Amazing how much a sunset sky can change during two minutes.


Sunset Road No. 1

 

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Last Saturday, on the way home to Wichita from northern Kansas, my wife, stepson, and I were  fortunate enough to be out on the plains as the sun set.  As usual, the urge to get home was powerful.   The sunset was only mediocre.   We made one stop, which only produced mediocre photos.   I was ready to stay on the highway and get home, but my wife and stepson urged me to stop again.  Usually I don’t get that much enthusiasm from the gang….so I thought OK, lets see if the next crossroad has a good name – not great criteria for chosing  a road for photography, but that’s how I was feeling.   The next green sign came up into view, announcing the name of the crossroad.    As I read the sign, it took a moment to sink in.   The actual, official, name of the road is “Sunset Road”.    Well if that isn’t a sign from above, I don’t know what is.   We pulled off and I shot for a bit.  The sunset never developed into one of those major shooting rays kind of thing, but it was very nice to be out on Sunset Road in the country.   Would I have stopped if the road was named “Smith Road”, or ” Rocky Road”, or whatever?…I don’t know.


Sunset at the Lake

 

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Mother nature must have known I needed new material.   The skies were interesting this weekend so I headed out to Sedgwick County Park in Wichita.  One of my favorite spots near the windmill was not working, the sunset was directly behind a big old ugly transmitter tower.   As sometimes happens, this turned out to be a fortunate turn of events as it forced me to find a new, better location from which to admire this handsome sunset.


In Search Of A More Perfect Sunset

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This one looked very  promising.  The windmill was even pleasingly aligned.  But alas, the hoped for super-spectacularness did not unfold.  But it was still pretty, just in a more subtle fashion than I had initially hoped.


Patience Pays No. 2

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The other ‘keeper’ from last weeks sunset excursion.   As I said in the previous post, this color only appeared 15 minutes after actual sunset – I had almost packed up and left the area.


Patience Pays

 

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The weather was unseasonably warm yesterday, so I decided to drive out to a local park in case the sunset was interesting.  It wasn’t at first.  I shot for awhile, but saw none of the pinks or reds I was hoping for.  I waited a full 15 minutes after sunset, and still all I had was blues and grays.   I removed the camera from the tripod, collapsed the tripod, and prepared to walk back to the car.   Then I saw, through the trees on the southern horizon a little bit of pinkish clouds.   Sure enough, there was some pink in a cloud to the north as well, color that hadn’t been there a minute before.   I decided to wait for a minute….and quickly the sky to the west began to colorize alarmingly quickly.    I set back up and shot like crazy for the 5 minutes or so it lasted.   I already knew this as a guiding principle – you need to wait for awhile after sunset to see what develops.  It was just that this time it really looked like nothing would happen.   Wrong!   Patience pays off in situations like this, don’t pack up too quickly.

Something else that is illustrated by this image is that it is possible to shoot something like this in an urban setting.   The windmill is set on a small hill, which I used to block the biking path, lake, road, cars, joggers, and tall light poles beyond.  Not that there’s anything wrong with those subjects, but that was not what I was after this evening.  All that matters is what is in the frame.

This is a three exposure HDR, hopefully not overcooked.  The only thing I could have wished different was that the bladed wheel at the top of the windmill was turned more in profile.   I tried my telekinetic powers, but the thing wouldn’t budge.   You can’t have everything.


Fiery Sky

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A fiery sunset behind one of the bridge towers in downtown Wichita.   Some people think the design of this pedestrian suspension bridge  was overdone, overpowering the site with it’s tall dual towers.   I find it pleasing and a favorite photographic subject that I am drawn to again and again.  If nothing else, I know it looks very interesting  in the fog, or with a spectacular sunset behind it.


Sunset On The Little Arkansas River

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You are looking at the very end of the Little Arkansas river in the heart of Wichita, where it flows into the Arkansas (sometimes called the Big Arkansas) river.  There is a small elevation drop you can see on the left side of the frame as the little river drops into the main river.   The ducks and geese were happy this particular evening because they got to enjoy a rain shower.  Blackbear Bosin’s Keeper of The Plains can be seen here, viewed head on.  This is a three exposure HDR processed in Photomatix Pro and Lightroom.


Clearing Storm At Sunset

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Here’s another clearing storm HDR image, taken closer to sunset than the one I posted last week.  This one has a more ominous feel to it I think, again showing the lower than normal Arkansas river and the Exploration Place science building.   It was a waiting game, killing time as the sun slowly moved behind the last line of clouds.    There’s some crepuscular ray action going on here, and that figure just below the sun is the well known Keeper of the Plains sculpture by Blackbear Bosin.


Clearing Storm #52

Nothing says Wichita like Exploration Place and the Arkansas River.  A brief and welcome rain shower had just passed, and the clouds were breaking up as sunset approached.  The part of the puzzle usually missing, which is me actually being there with camera and tripod ready, was miraculously present on this occasion and much feverish HDR bracketing mayhem ensued.   The river is extremely low at the moment, so sandbars normally under water are now visible.   I’m not sure if a full river would have improved this image or not.

By the way, would it be a mistake to admit that Clearing Storm #1 through #51 do not actually exist?


Riverfest Sky

While standing along the riverbank during the seemingly endless wait for Wichita Riverfest closing night fireworks, I amused myself by monitoring the sunset.   I swung the camera around (didn’t want to lose my fireworks spot by moving), and fired off a bracketed set of exposures. Combined in Photomatix, I thought the result makes for a fairly pleasing little informal landscape.   The sunset itself never developed into anything more spectacular than this, but it was a welcome diversion during my wait.


Bass Harbor HDR Revisted

Bass Harbor Lighthouse

One of my first blog posts was an HDR photo of the Bass Harbor Lighthouse at sunset.   Now that I have learned more, read more, seen more, I’ve come to cringe a little  over that early, over-the-top saturated version.  This time I went back and started from the original bracketed exposures and gave it another go, trying to achieve something more realistic.  I’ve toned down the saturation, and eliminated most of the halos.

Bass Harbor Lighthouse is just a great location, even if you end up shooting the same shot 1,000 other photographers have gotten.  Like I did.   At least the sky is different every sunset!

Here’s that earlier version for comparison.


Favorite Places – Bass Harbor Lighthouse

One of the favorite places I have had the pleasure photographing is the Bass Harbor Lighthouse in Maine.   Admittedly, it is one of the most photographed lighthouses on the planet – but as they say, it isn’t a cliche if you haven’t shot it yet.    Lighthouses  hold a particular appeal to me, probably because they are in short supply here in Kansas.    In 2008 I was lucky enough to visit Acadia National Park and surrounding areas, including this lighthouse.  There are two main places to shoot from, one on the west side looking back east (good for sunrise), and one to the east looking west (good for sunset).  We were there for sunset on this occasion, so east it was.

Bass Harbor Lighthouse at Sunset

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